Quick Answer: What Does Section 1 Require States To Do?

What does Article 1 say?

Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress.

Article One grants Congress various enumerated powers and the ability to pass laws “necessary and proper” to carry out those powers..

Why is Article 1 the most important?

Article I is the longest article in the Constitution; it establishes the national legislature called Congress. … This provision is very important because it allows Congress to react to situations that may not have existed when the Constitution was written.

Can a president change his VP?

If the Vice President dies, resigns, or becomes President, the President can appoint a new Vice President. The appointment needs to be confirmed by a majority vote of both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. This has happened twice.

What are the qualifications for Article 2 president?

No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident …

What are the two due process clauses?

Due process under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments can be broken down into two categories: procedural due process and substantive due process.

What does Article 2 say?

Article Two vests the power of the executive branch in the office of the president of the United States, lays out the procedures for electing and removing the president, and establishes the president’s powers and responsibilities.

What is the main focus of Article 1?

The main focus of article 1 is about the legislative branch and their roles and responsibilities to the U.S. government. Whats the main function of the legislative branch? The main function of the legislative branch is to write and make the laws.

What are state powers called?

Many powers belonging to the federal government are shared by state governments. Such powers are called concurrent powers. These include the power to tax, spend, and borrow money. State governments operate their own judicial systems, charter corporations, provide public education, and regulate property rights.

What does the President of the United States do?

The President is both the head of state and head of government of the United States of America, as well as Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. Under Article II of the Constitution, the President is responsible for the execution and enforcement of laws created by Congress.

What the president Cannot do?

A PRESIDENT CANNOT . . . declare war. decide how federal money will be spent. interpret laws. choose Cabinet members or Supreme Court Justices without Senate approval.

How does full faith and credit work?

Article IV, Section 1 of the United States Constitution, the Full Faith and Credit Clause, addresses the duties that states within the United States have to respect the “public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state.” According to the Supreme Court, there is a difference between the credit owed to …

Can the President order martial law?

Further, martial law suspends all existing laws, as well as civil authority and the ordinary administration of justice. In the United States, martial law may be declared by proclamation of the President or a State governor, but such a formal proclamation is not necessary.

Which branch of government has the greatest power Why?

The most important power of Congress is its legislative authority; with its ability to pass laws in areas of national policy. The laws that Congress creates are called statutory law. Most of the laws which are passed down by Congress apply to the public, and on some cases private laws.

What does the Constitution require states to do?

The Supreme Court has held that the Constitution requires all states to be admitted on an equal footing, though the Admissions Clause does not expressly include this requirement. The Property Clause grants Congress the power to make laws for the territories and other federal lands.

What is the purpose of Article 1 Section 1?

Article I, Section 1 vests all legislative powers of the federal government in a bicameral Congress. As explained above, this is often read to include a principle that legislative power cannot be delegated to the other branches, to individual members of Congress, or to private actors.

What does the full faith and credit clause require of states?

Article IV addresses something different: the states’ relations with each other, sometimes called “horizontal federalism.” Its first section, the Full Faith and Credit Clause, requires every state, as part of a single nation, to give a certain measure of respect to every other state’s laws and institutions.

What are 5 powers of the president?

The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors.

What are the first 10 amendments called?

The Bill of Rights is the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution. It spells out Americans’ rights in relation to their government. It guarantees civil rights and liberties to the individual—like freedom of speech, press, and religion.

What are the first 3 words of the Constitution?

The first three words of the Constitution are “We the People.” The document says that the people of the United States choose to create the government. “We the People” also explains that people elect representatives to make laws. This is a form of self-government. Words in bold are English words you may not know.

What does Section 2 require states to do?

Article IV, Section 2 guarantees that states cannot discriminate against citizens of other states. States must give people from other states the same fundamental rights it gives its own citizens. … It provides that the second state is obligated to return the fugitive to the state where the crime was committed.

What are 2 exceptions to the full faith and credit clause?

What are two exceptions to the Full Faith and Credit Clause? Civil laws apply to their own states. The State where person has residency can confirm or deny a divorce. Who is in charge of extradition?